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RM Auctions Mcmullen - Variety show

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TRUCK OR TREAT?

What is it?
1957 GMC Series 101 1/2-Ton Pickup Truck
It went for...?
$68,200
What powers it?
5800cc overhead valve V8 with a 206 hp, Hydramatic automatic transmission
What makes it special?
In the 1950s, with V8 motors becoming popular, GMC borrowed the base Pontiac V8 for their pickup truck. Its styling was car-like, with plenty of brightwork, wrap-around glazed areas and other passenger friendly features. Plus there’s the Hydramatic automatic gearbox and whitewall tyres!

GET THE GOAT

What is it?
1965 Pontiac GTO Tri-Power Convertible
It went for...?
$286,000
What powers it?
A 360 hp 6500cc V8 massaged by three two-barrel carburettors; paired to a four-speed manual transmission
What’s special about it?
Hey, it’s a Goat. The best Pontiac GTOs emerged from 1964 to 1974, and the most popular ones among those were produced between 1965 and 1967, with those signature vertically stacked headlamps and hood scoops. The Tri-Power option meant three two-barrel carbs that helped develop a whopping 360 horses.


SAFETY FAST

What is it?
1975 Bricklin SV-1 Coupe
It went for...?
$29,700
What powers it?
175 bhp 5878cc Ford V8; three-speed Ford automatic
What makes it special?
Malcolm Bricklin, who was a young millionaire, wanted to set up a car company bearing his name. At the same time, the Canadian province of New Brunswick wanted a car manufacturing plant too. Just like DeLorean, the province backed Bricklin's plans to build the SV-1. Safety Vehicle 1 was ahead of its time when it came to, er, safety. It featured a built-in roll cage, side guard rails and bumpers that receded into the car. Ford's 175 hp Windsor V8 and an aerodynamic design made it fast as well. Besides this, the SV-1 had a rust-proof acrylic over fibreglass body shell. As it always happens, the cost of the car plus supply and build quality issues meant the price went through the roof. By 1976, the plant shut its doors – it had earned a debt of over $23 million by then. Of the 2,854 units of the SV-1

DISKRIT

What is it?
1910 K-R-I-T Four Model A Runabout
It went for...?
$66,000
What powers it?
A four-cylinder 25 hp engine
paired with a three-speed manual transmission
What makes it special?
A swastika! Yes, the logo used in Krit cars was the swastika. Kenneth Crittenden, the founder of the firm, used it ‘to ensure favour of auspicious gods.’ Crittenden, a veteran of the automotive industry, who spent considerable time at Ford, decided to give his entreprenuership abilities a try. His aim was also to produce a reliable and affordable car for the masses. And he was fairly successful to that effect. This model is a superbly maintained and restored example of a Krit from its best years.

PROTO-TYPE

What is it?
1979 Pontiac Firebird Trans Am Type K
It went for...?
$154,000
What powers it?
185 hp, 6718cc V8, three-speed automatic gearbox
What’s special about it?
When the Pontiac Firebird and Chevrolet Camaro were up for their first reskinning exercise, both GM divisions thought they could spin off a wagon from the same platform. But the idea came to nought when they decided against inter-changeable doors. Pontiac however went ahead with the concept which had a Kammback rear styling and got Pininfarina to construct two
metal-bodied prototypes. Since production in limited numbers would be too expensive, the project turned out to be a non-starter. Of the two prototypes, this is the only one in private hands.

MONZA MATCH

What is it?
1964 Chevrolet Corvair Monza Spyder Convertible
It went for...?
$51,700
What powers it?
A 150 hp 2734cc rear-mounted six-cylinder turbocharged engine
What makes it special?
Chevrolet introduced the 150 horsepower Spyder option for Corvair Monza coupes and convertibles in 1962. These were turbocharged, which made them pretty unique in that era. To go with the performance, they came with optional kit like heavy duty suspension with revised spring rates and recalibrated shocks, a multi-gauge instrument cluster including a tacho, a cylinder head temperature gauge and intake manifold pressure gauge, front anti-roll bar, etc.

G-FORCES

 What is it?
1961 Chrysler 300G Convertible
It went for...?
$110,000
What powers it?
A 375 hp, 6884cc ‘wedge head’ V8, dual four-barrel
carburettors and cross ram intake; mated to a three-speed TorqueFlite automatic transmission
What’s special about it?
The last of Chrysler’s ‘letter’ cars, the 300G was fast, powerful, dramatic to look at and luxuriously appointed. At launch, the 300G came with some killer features – a pushbutton automatic transmission, a console mounted tachometer, power adjustable driver’s seat that could even swivel, power windows, power steering, power brakes and a power top. In fact this car starred in the commercial when DaimlerChrysler
re-introduced the hallowed 300 letter series cars a few years back.


DASHING!

What is it?
1902 Oldsmobile Model R Curved Dash Runabout
It went for...?
$66,000
What powers it?
A 4.5 hp single-cylinder motor with a two-speed transmission
What makes it special?
Production of this model was pure chance. A fire destroyed Ransom E Olds’ plant and all his prototypes, and left only a single-cylinder runabout unscathed. So Olds had no choice but to put it into production. One of the landmark cars of American automotive history, the famous Curved Dash from Oldsmobile was very successful in the market – in its first three years, annual production of the Model R (its real name) went from 425 units to 3,924 in 1903. The car features a diamond-tufted leather seat, large wooden spoke wheels, period white slick tyres, ‘Neverout’ kerosene safety lamps and a tiller to be used to steer it!

SMOKE ON WATER

What is it?
1966 Amphicar Convertible
It went for...?
$77,000
What powers it?
A 43 hp, 1147cc inline-four mated to a four-speed manual gearbox
What makes it special?
A car for the road and a boat for the beach. Just the kind of recreational machine for the Americans. Designed by Hans Trippel and built in Germany, the Amphicar’s Triumph Herald motor made it decently peppy on the road, but it couldn’t muster enough strength to handle the resistance caused by the four wheels on water. Still, when push came to shove, you could go boating on a placid lake, with those twin propellers causing ripples... at least among the people watching it in action. Only 800 Amphicars were built and not many are known to still exist.